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Calendar of Events: November 2018

Experience Modern architecture. Take a tour, view an exhibition, attend a lecture or otherwise connect with people equally captivated by the history and future of this period. Our online calendar highlights events related to Modern architecture in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, and occasionally further a field, presented by a wide-ranging roster of organizations.

15

LocalBook Talk

The Man in the Glass House: Book Talk with Mark Lamster

In a major new biography, The Man in the Glass House: Philip Johnson, Architect of the Modern Century, author Mark Lamster sheds light on one of the 20th-century architecture’s most celebrated and powerful figures. Mark Lamster is the architecture critic of the Dallas Morning News, a professor in the architecture school at the University of Texas at Arlington, and a 2017 Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Copies of the book will be available for sale at the event. More

29

LocalExhibition Opening

Paul Rudolph: The Hong Kong Journey

To celebrate the centennial of Paul Rudolph’s birth (1918-1997), the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation has organized two exciting exhibitions. Paul Rudolph: The Hong Kong Journey, presented in collaboration with the Center for Architecture, is an exhibition of previously unseen drawings, sketches, and renderings highlighting a fascinating chapter in Paul Rudolph’s dynamic and productive architectural career. Curated by Nora Leung, the exhibition focuses on three significant projects in Hong Kong, one of which, The Bond Center, was built, and provides insight into Rudolph’s process, illuminating his belief that architecture can both excite and exist within the framework of functional requirements. More

29

LocalLecture

After Postmodernism: From Laughed-at to Landmark

Postmodernism, a defining look of the 1980s, is not commonly associated with the architecture of Manhattan’s Upper East Side. However, amidst a sea of bricks, brownstone, and Beaux-Arts Classicism, glimpses of Postmodern design sensibility can be found both within the streetscape and in a number of notable interiors.. Buildings that were originally mocked are now gaining respect—even landmark status—as they are reevaluated decades after their debut. Join Judith Gura, author of Postmodern Design Complete and Interior Landmarks: Treasures of New York for a discussion about the origins of this controversial style, its influence on architecture, objects, interiors, and graphics, and the indelible mark it has left on the Upper East Side in particular. More

Townhouse for Matt Sabatine, New York, NY, Diana Agrest and Mario Gandelsonas, 1984
30

DOCOMOMO NY/TRIFilm Screening and Panel Discussion

Albert Frey: The Architectural Envoy

Albert Frey, the unpretentious Swiss-born mid-20th century architect, was a key figure in the introduction of Corbusian-influenced modernism to the United States. Through his innate curiosity about the American landscape, he developed an extraordinary design style, blending industrial techniques and a love of nature. A new film, Albert Frey: The Architectural Envoy–Part 1, explores his formative years while working closely with Le Corbusier in Europe. More

Continuing this month

LocalExhibition

July 15, 2018

Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948-1980

Situated between the capitalist West and the socialist East, Yugoslavia’s architects responded to contradictory demands and influences, developing a postwar architecture both in line with and distinct from the design approaches seen elsewhere in Europe and beyond. The architecture that emerged—from International Style skyscrapers to Brutalist “social condensers”—is a manifestation of the radical diversity, hybridity, and idealism that characterized the Yugoslav state itself. Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980 introduces the exceptional work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an international audience for the first time, highlighting a significant yet thus-far understudied body of modernist architecture, whose forward-thinking contributions still resonate today. More

Continuing this month

Further AfieldExhibition

July 30, 2018

Secret Cities: The Architecture and Planning of the Manhattan Project

On August 6, 1945, when the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, President Harry S. Truman publicly revealed the purpose of the sites now known as Oak Ridge, TN; Los Alamos, NM; and Hanford/Richland, WA. Secret Cities examines the innovative design and construction of these sites, built in the early years of the Modern Movement, and traces their precedents in the Bauhaus and other early Modern schools of architectural thought. It looks at daily life within the cities and how it was shaped by their physical form, illuminating the social stratification and segregation that were still evident despite the high-minded principles underlying their design. More

Continuing this month

LocalExhibition

September 28, 2018

Pedro E. Guerrero: The Photographer of Mid-Century New Canaan

Pedro E. Guerrero is internationally known for his work with Frank Lloyd Wright and sculptors Alexander Calder (1898–1976) and Louise Nevelson (1899–1988), as well as his photographs of Modern houses for popular mid-century shelter magazines. This exhibition includes 35 of Guerrero’s black and white photos, many depicting the architecture for which the town is famous, as well as a gallery devoted to the life of Guerrero and his family in New Canaan during some of the town’s most tumultuous years. More

Continuing this month

LocalExhibition

November 23, 2018

Paul Rudolph: The Personal Laboratory

The second of two exhibitions organized by the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation is Paul Rudolph: The Personal Laboratory, which has been extended through December 15. The exhibition explores how Rudolph’s residences – designed by himself, for himself – served as his laboratories for the psychologically compelling spaces that he developed throughout his career. Using an ever-expanding palette of experimental and lustrous materials, Rudolph designed homes that were courageously dramatic in their forms, organization, and spaces. These visually rich explorations reached their most adventurous frontiers in two New York City projects where he was both architect and client: the Modulightor Building and his multi-level home-office, the “Quadruplex” on Beekman Place. More

Continuing this month

LocalExhibition

November 29, 2018

Paul Rudolph: The Hong Kong Journey

To celebrate the centennial of Paul Rudolph’s birth (1918-1997), the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation has organized two exciting exhibitions. Paul Rudolph: The Hong Kong Journey, presented in collaboration with the Center for Architecture, is an exhibition of previously unseen drawings, sketches, and renderings highlighting a fascinating chapter in Paul Rudolph’s dynamic and productive architectural career. Curated by Nora Leung, the exhibition focuses on three significant projects in Hong Kong, one of which, The Bond Center, was built, and provides insight into Rudolph’s process, illuminating his belief that architecture can both excite and exist within the framework of functional requirements. More

2018